Collaborators

Feb. 14 2017 – 3:58am,

Been up for about an hour, have put a mean hurting on a mug of expresso. Thinking about what to write about this week, and then I realized something. When one works long, productive hours at some point they start questioning if their efforts are being appreciated. I’m not special, what I do is actually pretty normal. There are others who share this valiant struggle to be productive as early as possible, and I’ve met them.

I’ve learned that research driven industries have very dynamic relationship matrices, that can change even before a project is completed or even funded! It’s hard for a scientist to maintain ties while trying to cram as much research as possible. They will humor you up to a certain point and then, you have to part ways.  Teams and research funds are always changing, creating situations that you have to deal with and team members that have to be replaced. Yet none of it could be accomplished without people trusting your vision, and sharing the madness.

It’s a tough cookie trying to predict if a team will ever make it to funding their research before they have to part ways. So it is best to show appreciation to the team you have now.

Thanks for believing in me

This is their shoutout…

Meet our collaborating institutions:

Granja Marina: Economic Resiliency in the Dominican Republic and the Caribbean through Seaweed farming

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So we hear a lot about International Organizations who are working on the development of coastal communities; however, we keep seeing redundancy in their models for sustainability with no avail. What does this mean? Well, they keep trying to teach an old fisherman how to fish in a sustainable matter, yet once the program is over they revert back to what they know best. Well, in case the failed attempts throughout the last decade wasn’t a clue. I have news for you, fishing is not a sustainable enterprise. I hate to break it to you, but the fact that science has pretty much eliminated natural selection from the human growing cycle makes the playing field pretty uneven when it comes to harvesting fish.

As our population grows exponentially, we are en route to wiping out most of the commercial fishing species right out of the race. Not to mention the acidification of the oceans, and unfair fishing practices carried out without any oversight have all just about made our coasts a barren and sterile ecosystem.

What we are proposing is a new way for these communities to keep on making a living from the sea, by harvesting local seaweed species. If this sounds interesting to you, we invite you to find out a bit more about our seaweed farming project. Learn about the communities in which we work, and also see which United Nation’s Sustainable Development goals we contribute to, in this informative presentation about creating climate change resiliency in the Dominican Republic and Latin America through Seaweed Aquaculture.

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